Hitchcock-a-thon: The 39 Steps (1935)

39

If The Man Who Knew Too Much was Hitchcock’s launching pad out of career stagnation, The 39 Steps was the rocket which blasted him into the stratosphere.

Richard Hannay (Robert Donat) meets a young lady at a variety show (Lucie Mannheim) who he shelters in his London flat from menacing goons who pursue her. She reveals herself as a spy on the run from a team of assassins lead by a man missing half his little finger. After she is murdered overnight Hannay is falsely suspected by the police. On the run from the law and the assassins, he flees to Scotland in search of the mysterious organisation “The 39 Steps”

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That’s not how you do the Spock salute

The film is joyous entertainment from start to finish. The first half plays as one of his most suspenseful set-ups yet. Hitchcock’s self-confessed suspicion of the police comes into full play as the innocent Hannay runs through the Scottish heather with officers hot on his heels. But it’s not just the coppers who Hannay has to watch out for; time and time again supposed friends and allies turn against him. A farmer’s downtrodden wife (played with luminescent charisma by Peggy Ashcroft) proves to be one of the few he can trust.

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This guy….not so much

While the suspense doesn’t lessen for the second half, more humour is introduced to keep things balanced. There’s a wonderful satire on crowd mentalities as Hannay darts into a political meeting to escape his pursuers where he delivers an improvised and incoherent motivation speech…met with rapturous applause.

But the wittiest scenes come after Hannay ends up handcuffed to a woman he met on the train (Madeleine Carroll). The two exchange gloriously sharp sexual banter.

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“For God’s sake, cover your mouth when you yawn”

“Could I be of any assistance?” Donat asks Carroll as she struggles to take off her stockings. Believe it or not the line was considered so risqué Christian purity organisations tried to have the film banned.

The 39 Steps was Hitchcock’s biggest box office hit yet, both at home and in the US. It inspired The Sunday Times to declare “there is no doubt that Hitchcock is a genius. He is the real star of the film.” Dead right.

In terms of adventurous fun, could it get any better than this? Yes, as it turns out. The 39 Steps is a gem, but the crown jewel of Hitchcock’s pre-Hollywood years was still to come…

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12 thoughts on “Hitchcock-a-thon: The 39 Steps (1935)

  1. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Secret Agent (1936) | Folding Seats

  2. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Sabotage (1936) | Folding Seats

  3. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Young and Innocent (1937) | Folding Seats

  4. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Jamaica Inn (1939) | Folding Seats

  5. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Saboteur (1942) | Folding Seats

  6. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Spellbound (1945) | Folding Seats

  7. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: I Confess (1953) | Folding Seats

  8. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: The Wrong Man (1956) | Folding Seats

  9. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: North by Northwest (1959) | Folding Seats

  10. Pingback: Hitchcock-a-thon: Final thoughts | Folding Seats

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